News

 


 WESTERN BLUE DROP BEAR


        THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE 'LAMB ISLAND DROP BEAR'

For many years the Lamb Island Drop Bear lived in peaceful co-existence with the locals, harming neither people nor pets.

His favourite tree was the big old gum tree situated at the Ferry and Barge Terminal, where he could watch all the comings and goings on the island.

It is believed he fed on feral animals and the occasional turtle.

He mysteriously disappeared earlier this year during mating season. It is not known whether he hitched a ride or swam to another nearby island, or was killed by another younger bear, or has moved somewhere else on the island.

This mystery has unsettled the locals, who now take special care to keep pets and children indoors at night.

 

RANGER BRUCE is investigating.

 

 

 

NEWS PAPER ARTICLES.

 

NT News  April 19, 2010.

Kuala Lumpur.  Researchers said yesterday they have captured the first images of a spotted leopard in Malaysia, putting to rest a decades-old debate over the existence of the endangered cat.

The images were taken by camera traps set up in the Endau-Rompin national park.

[previously unknown animals are still being found].

 

 

NT News  June 2010.

THIN END OF THE WEDGE.

In reference to “staying alive by following croc rules” [May 26th].  I quite agree with Kristina. Culling on the grounds of public safety is just the thin edge of the wedge that can lead to the extinction of an entire species. The early colonists took this attitude on the grounds of public safety, to eliminate Drop Bears to the point of extinction, so today stories of Drop Bears are just exaggerated tales to tell tourists, a sad loss.  So learn to live with the dangers in our unique environment.

 

 

NT News June 2010.

RE THIN EDGE OF WEDGE.

I must disagree. The heavy culling of Drop Bears in the past has made them retreat to very isolated areas and very ‘Gun Shy’and afraid of people, thus it’s relatively safe to wander in the bush.

When crocs were hunted they reacted in the same way and our rivers and beaches were much safer than they are today.

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